1 Kings 19

What did Elijah do after the experience on Mount Carmel?
“Then the hand of the Lord was on Elijah, and he girded up his loins and outran Ahab to Jezreel” (1 Kings 18:46). Ahab had a summer palace at Jezreel, which was located 17 miles from Mount Carmel.

Why did Elijah go to Jezreel?
Perhaps he hoped that the events of Mount Carmel would serve to lead Ahab and Jezebel to repentance and the initiation of religious reform.

What did Ahab do once he returned home?
He gave Jezebel a blow-by-blow account of the events on Mount Carmel (19:1).

What was Jezebel’s response to the news?
She was furious and sent a messenger to Elijah to warn him that she would have him killed within 24 hours (19:2). Jezebel’s message was in the form of a binding, unbreakable oath. Rather than leading Jezebel to repentance, the Mount Carmel events aroused her anger and hostility and a desire for revenge. She was an obstinately wicked woman.

How did Elijah respond to the message from Jezebel?
A. He was afraid (19:3). He knew that this was no idle threat (see 1 Kings 18:4 and 13). Here we see the humanity of Elijah. The day before he had stood fearless on Mount Carmel and now he trembled at the threat of Jezebel. Perhaps this can be attributed in part, to his physical exhaustion. James 5:17 states, “Elijah was a man with a nature like ours…”

B. He ran for his life (19:3). Elijah ran from Jezreel to Beersheba, a distance in excess of 100 miles. Beersheba was in the southern part of the kingdom of Judah, out of Ahab and Jezebel’s jurisdiction.

C. He left his servant in Beersheba (19:3). This was the same servant mentioned in 1 Kings 18:43 who kept watch for the rain cloud while Elijah prayed.

D. He went a day’s journey into the wilderness and sat under a juniper tree (19:4). This was an opportunity for Elijah to spend some time alone with God.

E. He asked God to let him die (19:4). The Living Bible paraphrases this verse, “I’ve had enough…Take away my life. I’ve got to die sometime, and it might as well be now.”

F. He fell asleep (19:5). He was utterly exhausted.

Why do you think Elijah wanted to die?
He probably felt like a failure since the dramatic events of Mount Carmel did nothing to turn the king or the kingdom from idolatry. Elijah was discouraged by the thought that everything that had happened was in vain and fruitless and that nothing more could possibly be done by him for God’s cause.

What provision did God make for the weary prophet?
God miraculously provided bread and water for him (19:5-8) through an angel. Regarding angels, Psalm 103:20-21 states, “Bless the Lord, you His angels, Mighty in strength, who perform His word, Obeying the voice of His word! Bless the Lord, all you His hosts, You who serve Him doing His will.” Elijah ate two meals, which was sufficient to sustain him for forty days and nights at Horeb (Mt. Sinai). Someone has written, “God is a wise physician – food first, instruction, rebuke, after. He comes to man in the moment of his greatest helplessness, restores and strengthens him, and then prepares him for future usefulness and more splendid triumphs.”

Where did Elijah travel to from Beersheba?
Elijah traveled almost 200 miles south of Beersheba to Horeb (Mt. Sinai) where he found refuge in a cave (19:8-9). Elijah had traveled all the way back to where the nation began. Perhaps to regain perspective on his own life and the need to remain faithful in his efforts to call the people back to God.

What did God ask Elijah?
Now that he was physically stronger, God asked, “What are you doing here, Elijah?” (19:9). Notice two things in this question.

A. First, notice the use of the word “here.” Its use is as significant as the use of the word “there” in 1 Kings 17:4 and 9. On the occasions in 1 Kings 17, God instructed Elijah regarding where to go and when to go, but such was not the case when he ran from Jezebel. The word “here” accentuated the fact that he was far away from the place where God intended for him to be, namely in Israel. It is as if God were asking, “Who is to do the work there when you are here?” This was a rebuke.

B. Second, notice the use of the personal pronoun “you.” Elijah, above all men, should have remained at his post and faithful to his assignment. Fred M. Wood writes, “Life is for living, not for fleeing and hiding out when opposition arises and danger approaches.” Elijah, who had witnessed God’s great power on Mount Carmel, should have stood firm in the face of Jezebel’s threats. This too, was a rebuke.

What was Elijah’s answer to God’s question?
A. “I have been very zealous for the Lord, the God of hosts” (19:10). This was certainly true in every sense. Elijah had demonstrated an intense fervor for God in the face of a wicked king and a backslidden nation. Elijah’s devotion to God is accentuated when seen against the backdrop of the national apostasy.

B. “For the sons of Israel have forsaken Thy covenant, torn down Thine altars and killed Thy prophets with the sword” (19:10). Once again Elijah uttered truth. The northern kingdom had forsaken God’s word, will, and way (12:28-30). Israel’s apostasy was evident in destroyed altars (18:30) and murdered prophets (18:13).

C. “And I alone am left” (19:10). As God would later reveal to Elijah (19:18), he was not the only one left. But at this point in the story, Elijah was the only prophet to publicly confront and challenge the king and queen regarding their idolatry and wickedness. Elijah sincerely thought he was the only loyal prophet left.

D. “And they seek my life, to take it away” (19:10). This too, was a true statement. It seems however, that Elijah forgot that his life was in as much danger when Ahab conducted an international search for him. He was also in as much danger on Mount Carmel in the presence of 450 prophets of Baal and a backslidden people. God had protected him on those occasions and was certainly capable of protecting him from his present danger. Elijah seems to have temporarily lost sight of God’s strong arm.

How did God respond to Elijah’s complaint?
A. God told him to get out of the cave and “Go forth, and stand on the mountain before the Lord” (19:11).

B. The Lord gave Elijah a new revelation of Himself (19:11-12). Elijah witnessed the unlimited and tremendous power of God in [1] a wind so powerful that it broke apart rocks and mountains, [2] an earthquake that shook the very foundations of the mountains, and [3] a fire (perhaps lightning). But God was not in the wind, earthquake, or fire. These were merely manifestations of God’s power.

C. Finally, after the three tremendous displays of God’s power, there came “a sound of gentle blowing” (19:12) or “a still small voice.” Elijah was so convicted by the “sound of gentle blowing” that “he wrapped his face in his mantle, and went out and stood in the entrance of the cave” (19:13). Bill Chitwood comments, “This revelation seemed designed to show the fiery prophet who wanted to reform everything by means of tempest that God often pursues gentler, quiet means to accomplish His will” (page 158 of the Adult Teachers book). D.C. Martin notes, “Elijah needed the lesson that God was going to overthrow Baalism, but not as he expected” (page 119 of the Bible Book Study Commentary).

D. Elijah hears God’s convicting question once again, “What are you doing here, Elijah?” (19:13). Elijah gave God the same answer as before (compare 19:10 and 14). These were indeed the reasons why Elijah was not where he was supposed to be, but may indicate that Elijah was still despondent.

What new assignment did God give to Elijah?
It was time for Elijah to return to active duty! Work and service is often the best cure for despondency. Elijah needed “the tonic of a great task.” He needed to get back to work! God still had a job for Elijah to do.

A. God told Elijah to go to Damascus and anoint (designate) Hazael king over Aram (Syria). Hazael would become an instrument of God’s judgment upon Israel. Elijah did not fulfill this assignment (19:17). Elisha however, fulfilled this assignment (see 2 Kings 8:7-15).

B. God told Elijah to anoint Jehu the son of Nimshi king over Israel. Jehu was a son of Jehoshaphat and the grandson of Nimshi. Jehu would become an instrument of God’s judgment upon the house of Ahab (see 1 Kings 19:17 and 2 Kings 9:7). Elisha also fulfilled this assignment (see 2 Kings 9:1-13).

C. God told Elijah to anoint (designate) Elisha as prophet in his place. Elijah did fulfill this task (19:19). This must have indicated to Elijah that his ministry was drawing to a close.

What encouraging word did God share with Elijah regarding a faithful remnant?
God told Elijah that he was not the only loyal one left, but that there were 7,000 in Israel who had not bowed to Baal or kissed him in the ceremonies of idol worship. Even in the worst of times, God has a remnant of believers who remain faithful. Elijah must have been encouraged by the news that he was not alone.

What did Elijah do once he left Horeb?
He went and found Elisha plowing in a field and threw his mantle upon him to designate him as his successor. Elisha asked for permission to bid his family good-bye, sacrificed the oxen with which he was plowing, and then followed Elijah (19:19-21).

Practical Considerations

Disappointment often comes when our expectations are not met.
Elijah fully expected that the dramatic events on Mount Carmel would have a greater impact upon the king and the kingdom than they did. The events however, did not lead the king and queen to repentance and to the initiation of religious reform. They only served to intensify the hatred of Jezebel for the things of God. This response came as a hard blow to Elijah who retreated in fear and frustration.

It is easy to lose perspective when we are physically exhausted.
After the Mount Carmel experience and the marathon from Mount Carmel to Jezreel and from Jezreel to Beersheba, Elijah was physically exhausted. He sat under a tree and asked God to let him die. We should guard against making major decisions when we are physically exhausted or at a low point in our lives.

We should not lose heart in doing good.
It is easy to grow discouraged when our expectations are not met or when we see the faithlessness of those around us. It is easy to grow discouraged to the point of giving up when we feel that our efforts have gone unrecognized or seem fruitless. The Apostle Paul offers some words of encouragement. “And let us not lose heart in doing good, for in due time we shall reap if we do not grow weary” (Galatians 6:9). “Therefore, my beloved brethren, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that your toil is not in vain in the Lord” (1 Corinthians 15:58).

Service is often the best cure for despondency.
God gave Elijah a new assignment and told him to get to work. Service to others or to a cause bigger than ourselves is often the best medicine for the despondent. We can derive great strength from bearing one another’s burdens (Galatians 6:2) and from looking out for the interests of others (Philippians 2:3-4).

God will accomplish His work in His time and in accordance with His plan.
God sent judgment upon the house of Ahab and the nation of Israel through Jehu, Hazael, and Elisha. God will accomplish His purpose.

Don’t let go.
I Won’t Let Go…
I want to let go, but I won’t let go.
There are battles to fight,
By day and night,
For God and the right–
And I’ll never let go.

I want to let go, but I won’t let go.
I’m sick, tis true,
Worried and blue,
And worn through and through,
But I won’t let go.

I want to let go, but I won’t let go.
I will never yield!
What! lie down on the field
And surrender my shield?
No, I’ll never let go!

I want to let go, but I won’t let go.
May this be my song
“Mid legions of wrong–
Oh, God, keep me strong
That I may never let go!”

(Author Unknown)

Verse by Verse (NIV)

19:1 Now Ahab told [a detailed report] Jezebel everything Elijah had done [the events on Mount Carmel] and how he had killed all the prophets with the sword.

Ahab gave Jezebel a detailed report of the events on Mount Carmel.

19:2 So [unrepentant] Jezebel [filled with anger and hostility and desire for revenge] sent a messenger to Elijah to say [in the form of a binding, unbreakable oath], “May the gods deal with me, be it ever so severely, if by this time tomorrow [twenty-four hour deadline] I [Jezebel’s message was no idle death threat (see 1 Kings 18:4 and 13)] do not make your life [kill you] like one of them [prophets of Baal].”

Jezebel was furious when she heard about the events that had occurred on Mount Carmel. She sent a messenger to tell Elijah that she would have him killed with twenty-four hours. Jezebel’s message was in the form of a binding, unbreakable oath. The events that occurred on Mount Carmel should have led Jezebel to repentance. Instead, they aroused her anger and hostility and desire for revenge.

19:3 Elijah was afraid and ran for his life [Elijah was human! The day before he had stood fearless on Mount Carmel and now he trembled at the threat of Jezebel. Perhaps this can be attributed in part, to his physical exhaustion (see James 5:17).]. When he came to Beersheba in Judah [from Jezreel to Beersheba (over 100 miles)…Beersheba in the southern part of the kingdom of Judah, out of Ahab and Jezebel’s jurisdiction], he left his servant [see 1 Kings 18:43] there [in Beersheba],

Elijah was afraid. He knew that this was no idle threat (see 1 Kings 18:4 and 13). Here we see the humanity of Elijah. The day before he had stood fearless on Mount Carmel and now he trembled at the threat of Jezebel. Perhaps this can be attributed in part, to his physical exhaustion. James 5:17 states, “Elijah was a man with a nature like ours…”

Elijah ran for his life. He ran from Jezreel to Beersheba, a distance in excess of 100 miles. Beersheba was in the southern part of the kingdom of Judah, out of Ahab and Jezebel’s jurisdiction.

Elijah left his servant in Beersheba. This was the same servant mentioned in 1 Kings 18:43 who kept watch for the rain cloud while Elijah prayed.

19:4 while he himself went a day’s journey into the desert. He came to a broom tree, sat down under it [scant shade in the desert] and prayed that he might die [Elijah: [1] probably felt like a failure since the dramatic events of Mount Carmel did not turn the king or kingdom from idolatry; [2] discouraged that his efforts for God’s cause apparently were in vain.]. “I have had enough, Lord,” he said. “Take my life; I am no better than my ancestors [“I’ve had enough…Take away my life. I’ve got to die sometime, and it might as well be now.” (Living Bible)].”

Elijah went a day’s journey into the wilderness and sat under a broom tree. This was an opportunity for Elijah to spend some time alone with God. He asked God to take his life. The Living Bible paraphrases this verse, “I’ve had enough…Take away my life. I’ve got to die sometime, and it might as well be now.”

Elijah probably felt like a failure since the dramatic events of Mount Carmel did nothing to turn the king or the kingdom from idolatry. Elijah was discouraged by the thought that everything that had happened was in vain and fruitless and that nothing more could possibly be done by him for God’s cause.

19:5 Then he lay down [utterly exhausted] under the tree and fell asleep. All at once an angel of the Lord [see Psalm 103:20-21] touched him and said, “Get up and eat.”

Elijah fell asleep. He was utterly exhausted. God miraculously provided bread and water for him (19:5-8) through an angel. Regarding angels, Psalm 103:20-21 states, “Bless the Lord, you His angels, Mighty in strength, who perform His word, Obeying the voice of His word! Bless the Lord, all you His hosts, You who serve Him doing His will.”

19:6 He looked around, and there by his head was a cake of bread baked over hot coals, and a jar of water [God miraculously provided bread and water for him.]. He ate and drank and then lay down again.

19:7 The angel of the Lord came back a second time and touched him and said, “Get up and eat, for the journey is too much for you.”

19:8 So he got up and ate and drank [Elijah ate two meals which was sufficient to sustain him for forty days and nights of travel to Horeb (Mt. Sinai)]. Strengthened by that food [“God is a wise physician – food first, instruction, rebuke, after. He comes to man in the moment of his greatest helplessness, restores and strengthens him, and then prepares him for future usefulness and more splendid triumphs.”], he traveled forty days and forty nights until he reached Horeb [the place where God had disclosed Himself to Moses — perhaps to regain perspective on his own life and the need to remain faithful in his efforts to call the people back to God.], the mountain of God.

Elijah ate two meals, which was sufficient to sustain him for forty days and nights of travel to Horeb (Mt. Sinai). Someone has written, “God is a wise physician – food first, instruction, rebuke, after. He comes to man in the moment of his greatest helplessness, restores and strengthens him, and then prepares him for future usefulness and more splendid triumphs.”

19:9 There he went into a cave [Elijah traveled almost 200 miles south of Beersheba to Horeb (Mt. Sinai) where he found refuge in a cave — perhaps the very “cleft in the rock” where Moses had stood when God’s glory passed by (Ex. 33:21-23)] and spent the night. And [now that he was physically stronger] the word of the Lord came to him: “What are you [personal pronoun “you” suggests that Elijah, above all men, should have remained at his post and faithful to his assignment…Elijah, who had witnessed God’s great power on Mount Carmel, should have stood firm in the face of Jezebel’s threats. This was a rebuke.] doing here [word “here” accentuated the fact that he was far away from the place where God intended for him to be, namely in Israel. It is as if God were asking, “Who is to do the work there when you are here?” This was a rebuke.], Elijah?”

Elijah traveled almost 200 miles south of Beersheba to Horeb (Mt. Sinai) where he found refuge in a cave. Perhaps this cave was the very “cleft in the rock” where Moses had stood when God’s glory passed by (see Ex. 33:21-23).

Elijah traveled all the way back to where God had disclosed Himself to Moses. Perhaps to regain perspective on his own life and the need to remain faithful in his efforts to call the people back to God.

Now that he was physically stronger, God asked, “What are you doing here, Elijah?” (19:9). Notice two things in this question.

First, notice the use of the word “here.” Its use is as significant as the use of the word “there” in 1 Kings 17:4 and 9. On the occasions in 1 Kings 17, God instructed Elijah regarding where to go and when to go, but such was not the case when he ran from Jezebel. The word “here” accentuated the fact that he was far away from the place where God intended for him to be, namely in Israel. It is as if God were asking, “Who is to do the work there when you are here?” This was a rebuke.

Second, notice the use of the personal pronoun “you.” Elijah, above all men, should have remained at his post and faithful to his assignment. Fred M. Wood writes, “Life is for living, not for fleeing and hiding out when opposition arises and danger approaches.” Elijah, who had witnessed God’s great power on Mount Carmel, should have stood firm in the face of Jezebel’s threats. This too, was a rebuke.

19:10 He replied, “I have been very zealous for the Lord God Almighty [Elijah’s had demonstrated faithfulness to God in the face of a wicked king and a backslidden nation]. The Israelites have rejected your covenant, broken down your altars, and out your prophets to death with the sword [northern kingdom had forsaken God’s word, will, and way (12:28-30); Israel’s apostasy evident in destroyed altars (18:30) and murdered prophets (18:13).]. I am the only one left [God would later reveal to Elijah that he was not the only one left; at this point in the story, Elijah was the only prophet to publicly confront and challenge the king and queen regarding their idolatry and wickedness; Elijah sincerely thought he was the only loyal prophet left], and now they are trying to kill me too [Elijah forgot that his life was in danger [1] when Ahab conducted an international search for him, and [2] on Mount Carmel in the presence of 450 prophets of Baal. God had protected him in the past and would do so in the present; Elijah temporarily lost sight of God’s strong arm].”

“I have been very zealous for the Lord God Almighty. This was certainly true in every sense. Elijah had demonstrated an intense fervor for God in the face of a wicked king and a backslidden nation. Elijah’s devotion to God is accentuated when seen against the backdrop of the national apostasy.

“The Israelites have rejected your covenant, broken down your altars, and out your prophets to death with the sword.” Once again Elijah uttered truth. The northern kingdom had forsaken God’s word, will, and way (12:28-30). Israel’s apostasy was evident in destroyed altars (18:30) and murdered prophets (18:13).

“I am the only one left.” As God would later reveal to Elijah, he was not the only one left. But at this point in the story, Elijah was the only prophet to publicly confront and challenge the king and queen regarding their idolatry and wickedness. Elijah sincerely thought he was the only loyal prophet left.

“And now they are trying to kill me too.” This too, was a true statement. It seems however, that Elijah forgot that his life was in as much danger when Ahab conducted an international search for him. He was also in as much danger on Mount Carmel in the presence of 450 prophets of Baal and a backslidden people. God had protected him on those occasions and was certainly capable of protecting him from his present danger. Elijah seems to have temporarily lost sight of God’s strong arm.

19:11 The Lord said, “Go out and stand on the mountain in the presence of the Lord, for the Lord is about to pass by [God gave Elijah a new revelation of Himself].” Then [Elijah witnessed the unlimited and tremendous power of God in…] a [1] great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the Lord, but the Lord was not in the wind. After the wind there was [2] an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake.

God told him to get out of the cave and “Go forth, and stand on the mountain before the Lord” (19:11).

19:12 After the earthquake came [3] a fire [perhaps lightning], but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire came a gentle whisper [God was not in the wind, earthquake, or fire, mere manifestations of God’s power; after the tremendous displays of God’s power, there came “a gentle whisper” or “a still small voice.”].

The Lord gave Elijah a new revelation of Himself (19:11-12). Elijah witnessed the unlimited and tremendous power of God in [1] a wind so powerful that it broke apart rocks and mountains, [2] an earthquake that shook the very foundations of the mountains, and [3] a fire (perhaps lightning). But God was not in the wind, earthquake, or fire. These were merely manifestations of God’s power.

Finally, after the three tremendous displays of God’s power, there came “a gentle whisper” or “a still small voice.”

19:13 When Elijah heard it, he pulled his cloak over his face [a demonstration of reverence and fear] and went out and stood at the mouth of the cave. Then a voice said to him, “What are you doing here, Elijah?”

Elijah was so convicted by the “gentle whisper” that “he pulled his cloak over his face and went out and stood at the mouth of the cave.” Bill Chitwood comments, “This revelation seemed designed to show the fiery prophet who wanted to reform everything by means of tempest that God often pursues gentler, quiet means to accomplish His will” (page 158 of the Adult Teachers book). D.C. Martin notes, “Elijah needed the lesson that God was going to overthrow Baalism, but not as he expected” (page 119 of the Bible Book Study Commentary).

Elijah heard God’s convicting question once again, “What are you doing here, Elijah?” Elijah gave God the same answer as before (compare 19:10 and 14). These were indeed the reasons why Elijah was not where he was supposed to be, but may indicate that Elijah was still depressed.

Note: What are some ways that God has spoken to you?

19:14 He replied, “I have been very zealous for the Lord God Almighty. The Israelites have rejected your covenant, broken down your altars, and put your prophets to death with the sword. I am the only one left, and now they are trying to kill me too.”

19:15 The Lord said to Him, “Go back [work and service is often the best cure for despondency; Elijah needed “the tonic of a great task;” God still had a job for Elijah to do] the way you came, and go to the Desert of Damascus. When you get there, anoint Hazael king over Aram [God told him to go to Damascus and anoint (designate) Hazael king over Aram (Syria). Hazael would become an instrument of God’s judgment upon Israel. This assignment fulfilled by Elisha (2 Kings 8:7-15) rather than Elijah.].

It was time for Elijah to return to active duty! Work and service is often the best cure for despondency. Elijah needed “the tonic of a great task.” He needed to get back to work! God still had a job for Elijah to do.

God told Elijah to go to Damascus and anoint (designate) Hazael king over Aram (Syria). Hazael would become an instrument of God’s judgment upon Israel. Elijah did not fulfill this assignment (19:17). Elisha however, fulfilled this assignment (see 2 Kings 8:7-15).

19:16 Also, anoint Jehu son of Nimshi king over Israel [Jehu was a son of Jehoshaphat and the grandson of Nimshi. Jehu would become an instrument of God’s judgment upon the house of Ahab (see 1 Kings 19:17 and 2 Kings 9:7); This assignment fulfilled by Elisha (2 Kings 9:1-13)], and anoint Elisha son of Shaphat from Abel Meholah to succeed you [indicated Elijah’s ministry was drawing to a close] as prophet [in his place].

God told Elijah to anoint Jehu the son of Nimshi king over Israel. Jehu was a son of Jehoshaphat and the grandson of Nimshi. Jehu would become an instrument of God’s judgment upon the house of Ahab (see 1 Kings 19:17 and 2 Kings 9:7). Elisha also fulfilled this assignment (see 2 Kings 9:1-13). God told Elijah to anoint (designate) Elisha as prophet in his place. Elijah did fulfill this task (19:19). This must have indicated to Elijah that his ministry was drawing to a close.

19:17 Jehu will put to death any who escape the sword of Hazael, and Elisha will put to death any who escape the sword of Jehu.

19:18 Yet I reserve [technical term for people who survived elimination or catastrophe] seven thousand [Elijah was not the only faithful individual left as he had mistakenly thought (18:10)] in Israel–all whose knees have not bowed down [your convictions are in your knees] to Baal and all whose mouths have not kissed him.”

God told Elijah that he was not the only loyal one left, but that there were 7,000 in Israel who had not bowed to Baal or kissed him in the ceremonies of idol worship. Even in the worst of times, God has a remnant of believers who remain faithful. Elijah must have been encouraged by the news that he was not alone.

19:19 So Elijah went from there and found Elisha son of Shaphat. He was plowing with twelve yoke of oxen, and he himself was driving the twelfth pair. Elijah went up to him and threw his cloak around him.

He went and found Elisha plowing in a field and threw his mantle upon him to designate him as his successor.

19:20 Elisha then left his oxen and ran after Elijah. “Let me kiss my father and mother good-bye,” he said, “and then I will come with you.” “Go back,” Elijah replied. “What have I done to you?”

Elisha asked for permission to bid his family good-bye, sacrificed the oxen with which he was plowing, and then followed Elijah

19:21 So Elisha left him and went back. He took his yoke of oxen and slaughtered them. He burned the plowing equipment to cook meat and gave it to the people, and they ate. Then he set out to follow Elijah and to be his attendant.

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